This week has seen the release of new U.S. data breach statistics by the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC). The new report reveals the extent to which organizations have been attacked over the past decade, breaking down data breaches by industry sector.

ITRC has been collecting and collating information on U.S. data breaches since 2005. Since records of security breaches first started to be kept, ITRC figures show a 397% increase in data exposure incidents. This year has seen the total number of data breach incidents surpass 6,000, with 851 million individual records now having been exposed since 2015.

U.S. Data Breach Statistics by Industry Sector

The financial sector may have been extensively targeted by cybercriminals seeking access to financial information, but between 2005 and March 2016 the industry only accounts for 7.9% of data breaches. The heavily regulated industry has implemented a range of sophisticated cybersecurity protections to prevent breaches of confidential information which has helped to keep data secure. The business and healthcare sectors were not so well protected and account for the majority of data breaches over the past decade.

Over the course of the past decade financial sector ranked lowest for breaches of Social Security numbers. The largest data security incident exposed 13.5 million records. That data breach occurred when data was on the move.

At the other end of the scale is the business sector, which includes the hospitality industry, retail, transport, trade, and other professional entities. This sector had the highest number of data breaches accounting for 35.6% of all data breaches reported in the United States. Those breaches exposed 399.4 million records.

ITRC’s U.S. data breach statistics show that the business sector was the most frequently targeted by hackers over the course of the past decade, accounting for 809 hacking incidents. Hackers were able to steal 360.1 million records and the industry accounted for 13.6% of breaches that exposed credit and debit card numbers. The huge data breaches suffered by Home Depot and Target involved the exposure of a large percentage of credit and debit card numbers.

Healthcare Sector Data Breaches Behind the Massive Rise in Tax Fraud

The business sector was closely followed by the healthcare industry, which has been extensively targeted in recent years. ITRC reports that the industry accounted for 16.6% of data breaches that exposed Social Security numbers. Since 2005, over 176.5 million healthcare records have been exposed and over 131 million records were exposed as a result of hacking since 2007. That includes the 78.8 million records exposed in the Anthem Inc., data breach discovered early last year.

While hacking has exposed the most records, employee negligence and error were responsible for 371 data breaches in the healthcare industry.  Healthcare industry data breaches are believed to have been responsible for the massive increase in tax fraud experienced this year. Tax fraud surged by 400 percent in 2016.

Government organizations and military data breaches make up 14.4% of U.S data breaches over the past decade, with the education sector experiencing a similar number, accounting for 14.1% of breaches. Over 57.4 million Social Security numbers were exposed in government/military data breaches along with more than 389,000 credit and debit card numbers.

The education sector experienced the lowest number of insider data breaches of all industry sectors (0.7%) although 2.4 million records were exposed via email and the Internet.

Cybersecurity Protections Need to Be Improved

The latest U.S. data breach statistics show that all industry sectors are at risk of cyberattack, and all must improve cybersecurity protections to keep data secure. According to Adam Levin, chairman and founder of IDT911, “Companies need to create a culture of privacy and security from the mailroom to the boardroom. That means making the necessary investment in hardware, software and training. Raising employee cyber hygiene awareness is as essential as the air we breathe.”